Panthera pardus orientalis

PANTHERA PARDUS ORIENTALIS

Amur Leopard

Introducing Our Amur Leopards

We are currently home to two Amur leopards.

Our male came to us from Berlin Tierpark Zoo in June 2007. His name is Skodje, and he was born in October 2005. In January 2009, we received a female from Helsinki Zoo. Her name is Zane and she was born in April 2007.

On the 24 February 2014 our female Zane left Edinburgh Zoo to return to Helsinki.

Breeding Category Programme:

Our Amur leopards are part of the European Endangered Species breeding programme.

Location in the Zoo

Our Amur leopards can be found at the big cat enclosures

Find out more

Status

  • DD
    DATA DEFICIENT
  • lc
    LEAST CONCERN
  • nt
    NEAR THREATENED
  • VU
    VULNERABLE
  • EN
    ENDANGERED
  • CR
    CRITICALLY ENDANGERED
  • EW
    EXTINCT IN THE WILD
for more information on classifications visit www.iucnredlist.org

Size

animal Relative to 6ft (2m) man

Population

14
to20
IUCN February 2005

Habitat

  • Mountains

  • Grasslands

Diet

image-placeholder Carnivore

In the Wild

Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) are considered one of the most endangered cats in the world. They are one of the most distinct sub-species of leopards, due to their pale coat with large, dark, widely spaced rosettes. Due to the harsh environment in which they live, Amur leopards grow a thick, dense coat to keep out the cold in winter. Vocally leopards tend to give a distinctive rasping call, rather than a growl.

Leopards live and hunt alone, and are most active at night. They hunt by stalking and waiting until they are a few meters away before attacking their prey. Their diet consists of hares, musk deer, rodents, roe deer and sika deer. Once they have caught a meal they will not eat it all at once but will store it up in a tree for later.

This species used to cover areas of China, Russia, and the Korean peninsula. However, their numbers have reduced dramatically, and they are no longer found in China or Korea. In the Russia as few as 35 adults are estimated to survive.

This dramatic decline is mainly due to poaching of both leopards and their prey animals, habitat destruction due to human activity, and inbreeding. As the population of these big cats dwindles, genetic diversity also dwindles, weakening the species. The Amur leopard was found to have the lowest levels of genetic variation of any leopard subspecies.

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