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Animals & Attractions

Swamp Wallaby

We have two groups of swamp wallabies, made up adults and their joeys.

Location in the Zoo:

The main group can be found in our new Wallaby Outback enclosure. The others can seen in the enclosure near the banteng.

Breeding Programme Category

Our wallabies are part of the European Stud Book Prorgramme (ESB)

In the Wild

The swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor) is native to eastern Australia, where it ranges from Cape York, Queensland in the north, to Victoria and south-eastern South Australia.  Despite their name, swamp wallabies live in forests, scrublands and woodlands with thick undergrowth.

Swamp wallabies resemble kangaroos, but are smaller and have longer fur.  Males are larger and heavier than females, while the tail on both sexes is the same length as the body.  Their fur is mostly brown, with a lighter chest and a light stripe on each cheek.

Swamp wallabies have a mixed diet feeding on bushes, ferns, flowers, grasses, herbs, plants, shrubs and tree saplings.  They can be found grazing in pasture, agricultural crops, and exotic tree plantations.  Their molars are specially shaped to help cut through the coarse, thick vegetation of their diet.

Wallabies are similar to kangaroos and koalas in the fact they are marsupials. this means that they have a different reproductive system compares to other mammals. After mating the tiny embryo, which is the size of a jelly bean is born. It crawls into the pouch of the female wallaby and attaches to a teat where it stays for a few months to develop. When the baby (called a joey) is ready to emerge they can often be seen poking out of their mothers pouch before fully emerging, even after this stage they will return to the pouch when frightened for the first few months.

Koalas are marsupials and this means they have a different reproductive system compares to other mammals. After mating the 11 – 35 day old embryo, which is the size of a jelly bean at this stage, is born. It crawls into the pouch of the female koala and attaches to a teat where it stays for approximately 7 months to develop, similar to kangaroos and wallabies. In the pouch the joey (baby) feeds on milk and a substance called ‘pap’, which is a watery form of the mother’s poo. This will provide the joey’s digestive system with the micro-organisms essential for digesting the toxic eucalyptus leaves. When the baby (called a joey) is ready to emerge they can often be seen poking out of their mothers rear-facing they are developed enough to come out and ride around on its mother’s back. - See more at: /2367.aspx#sthash.pSZeUODK.dpuf

 

Find out more

Status

Not Endangered NE
Data Deficient DD
Least Concern LC
Near Threatened NT
Vulnerable VU
Endangered EN
Critically Endangered CR
Extinct in the wild EW
Extinct EX

Least Concern

For more info on classifications visit www.iucnredist.org

Size

Relative to 6ft (2m) man Relative to 6ft (2m) man

Population

Population is increasing, IUCN June 2008

Habitat

  • Rainforests

    Rainforests

Diet

Herbivore Herbivore
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