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Sumatran Tiger

We are currently home to a male Sumatran tiger called Jambi. He was born at Dudley Zoo in the West Midlands in 2003 and then moved to Berlin when he was a year old before arriving here in July 2015.

 

Location in the Zoo

Our tigers can be found at the big cat enclosures.

Breeding Programme Category:

Our Sumatran tigers are part of the European Endangered Species Programme. (EEP)

 

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Status

Not Endangered NE
Data Deficient DD
Least Concern LC
Near Threatened NT
Vulnerable VU
Endangered EN
Critically Endangered CR
Extinct in the wild EW
Extinct EX

Critically Endangered

For more info on classifications visit www.iucnredist.org

Size

Relative to 6ft (2m) man Relative to 6ft (2m) man

Population

441
to679
Population decreasing, IUCN June 2008

Habitat

  • Rainforests

    Rainforests

Diet

Carnivore Carnivore
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In The Wild

The Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) is a subspecies that is native to the Indonesian island of Sumatra. It lives in forest habitats in both lowland and mountainous areas.

The Sumatran tiger is the smallest of all tiger subspecies, and its stripes are narrower than those of other tigers. It also has a distinctive bearded and maned appearance, especially the males. In the wild, Sumatran tigers prey on wild boar, Malayan tapirs and deer. They also prey on monkeys, fish, and birds.

Sumatran tigers are fast losing ground to many threats. Habitat loss, fragmentation and destruction are pushing tigers into smaller and smaller areas and closer to human habitations, making human-tiger conflicts more common. Habitat loss and fragmentation also makes the tigers’ prey food sources scarcer. Much of this habitat loss can be attributed to expansion of farming activities.

Poaching of tigers for illegal trade and traditional medicine is also rife in Indonesia due to the strong demand for tiger products in Indonesia and in other countries. Although there are some protected areas for the tiger on Sumatra and conservation efforts are continuing, many tigers are killed by poachers even within the protected zones—and sometimes even in zoos.

Estimates of the number of Sumatran tigers left in the wild are discouraging. A study in 2004 placed the number of Sumatran tigers in the wild at around 340 – 500.

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